reader be charitable

siins:

im rewatching s4 so here u go 

greathaircut:

million dollar idea for a men’s hygiene product: shower helmets for when you see yourself reflected on the shower glass and try to headbutt the naked male encroaching on your territory

unimpressedcats:

me

intensefoodcravings:

Miniature Lemon Blueberry Cheesecakes

gender-wizard:

being gay is NOT a choice. it is a game and I am winning.

gwnne:

my partner tried to call me a sweetheart the other day but he misspelled it and I read it as “sweetbeard” and then I decided that this is what dwarf couples call each other

so, naturally, here are two dwarves on a date

queerpotters:

what if harry had been sorted into slytherin though

  • sarcastic bastard and no need to pretend otherwise
  • learning the names of people outside your immediate circle of friends??? please
  • usually overdramatic, sometimes morally grey
  • sirius having to deal with the fact that his godson is a slytherin. a slytherin. james potter’s son is in slytherin. remus can you believe this
  • bezzies-by-circumstance with draco malfoy with all the highlights including a) earth-shattering fights, b) someone brazen enough to curb draco’s nastiness, and c) someone unimpressed enough to tell harry to get a fucking grip and stop being so self-righteous all the time potter you frilly whingebag
  • (and a friendship with harry/draco reluctantly getting roped into his cause could have changed a whole buncha shit for the malfoys and all that Malfoy Joins the Order With Snape fic of ‘03-‘05 could have come true)
  • speaking of, a head of house/student relationship with snape might have saved his character from being entirely reprehensible
  • challenging the wizarding public’s views of slytherin house by pitting their ridiculous prejudices against their blind all-consuming love for/faith in harry
  • quirrell was a ravenclaw and wormtail was a gryffindor [insert harry’s sarcastic one-liner about all the witches and wizards who went bad being in slytherin here]
  • jkr putting her money where her mouth is re: “we’ve all got both light and dark inside us, it’s our choices who make us who we truly are” by putting the boy who lived and eventual saviour of the wizarding world in the ~evil house~
  • or even better she could have established slytherin as the ~evil house~ and then dismantled that completely by showing harry surrounded by loving, caring people forced to choose between standing beside their friend harry or supporting voldemort’s/their parents’ cause
  • harry’s group of friends torn in two by their parents’ ideology and their loyalty to harry and what they’ve seen to be true while sharing a home with hundreds of halfbloods and muggleborns
  • and then members of slytherin house fighting tooth and nail against the people who raised them because harry potter just has that effect on people
  • all resulting in an eventual about-face in people’s attitudes towards slytherins
  • and when harry has kids they’re proud at the thought of being sorted into slytherin house because their dad was a slytherin and he saved the fucking world

NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:
If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
(SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)
ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.

love-the-walking-dead:

Lovely.

glowcloud:

i love the Women Against Feminism that are like “I dont need feminism because i can admit i need my husband to open a jar for me and thats ok!” cause listen 1. get a towel 2. get the towel damp 3. put it on the lid and twist. BAM now men are completely useless. you, too, can open a jar. time to get a divorce

vvidget:

whiteboyfriend:

local gay couple judges saturday morning runners

if i ever dont reblog this assume im dead


Kelsey|20
I get a lot of something out of people getting excited about the whole wide world.

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